ART NEWS

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January 13, 2021

Anja Rubik for Vogue Italia with one of the most completely misunderstood animal species on earth. Rattus Chordata. The humble rat

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November 19, 2020

By ANNA BRADY

Announcement comes as two of the gallery's presidents in the US are facing allegations of abuse in the workplace.

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November 18, 2020

By EMI ELEODE

Using radar technology, archaeologists have uncovered the remains of a 19m-long ship beneath a farmer's fields

Art Photography

INSPIRATIONAL ART: FROM PHOTOCOPIES TO SEDUCTIVE SELFIE MAGNETS

October 16, 2020

By John McDonald

Lindy Lee grew up in Brisbane in the 1960s, the daughter of Chinese parents who left Guandong when the Communists came to power. She is ethnically Chinese but Australian born and bred, a duality that has coloured her entire life. She remembers being the only Chinese face in her classes at school, which meant she could never quite fit in, no matter how desperately she wanted to be just like the other kids. In later life her lack of Chinese language skills would make it equally difficult to reclaim an ancestral cultural heritage.
To become the artist she is today, Lee had to get lost before she could be found. She had to learn to embrace her own confusion and insecurity, transforming these frailties into a source of strength. Lindy Lee: Moon in a Dew Drop, at the Museum of Contemporary Art, reveals an artist for whom each new body of work has been a means of self-discovery. It may be the most fundamental reason for making art.

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